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Athletic Box

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Athletic Box is a funny casual game that was developed by Retoxin Games. In this game keep away from the red obstacles. You can use both the top and bottom of the line. You can also jump. Swipe up or down in order to control the athlete. Go as far as you can without touching any obstacles. You can install this game into your Android device from this link or play on your browser from that link. Have fun!

Google Play

You can publish this game on your web site by simply adding below code.

<iframe src="https://retoxin.com/retoxin_games/athleticbox/" width="450" height="800" scrolling="none" frameborder="0"></iframe>

Athletic Box Screenshot 1
Athletic Box Screenshot 2
Athletic Box Screenshot 3
Athletic Box Screenshot 4
Athletic Box Screenshot 5
Athletic Box Screenshot 6

Aisle

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In this game you control a ball. Change the direction of the ball by tapping/clicking the screen. Do not drop the ball down the aisle. Collect the golden cubes. Earn points for each new aisle you switch. You can install this game into your Android device from this link or play on your browser from that link. Have fun!

Google Play

You can publish this game on your web site by using below code.

<iframe src="https://retoxin.com/retoxin_games/aisle/" width="440" height="790" scrolling="none" frameborder="0"></iframe>

Aisle Screenshot
Aisle Screenshot
Aisle Screenshot
Aisle Screenshot
Aisle Screenshot
Aisle Screenshot

Ring

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In this game you control a ring through which the cable passes. Do not allow the ring to contact the cable passing through it. Tap in order to bounce up. You can install this game into your Android device from this link or play on your browser from that link. Have fun!

Google Play

You can publish this game on your web site by using below code.

<iframe src="https://retoxin.com/retoxin_games/ring/" width="460" height="790" scrolling="none" frameborder="0"></iframe>


 

Ring Screenshot 1
Ring Screenshot 2
Ring Screenshot 3
Ring Screenshot 4
Ring Screenshot 5
Ring Screenshot 6

Colorful Circles

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Here is our newest and funny game Colorful Circles. Raise the ball without touching different colored circle pieces. The color of the ball changes as you collect points after each circle. As the game progresses you will be confronted with much more difficult Colourful Circles. You can install this game into your Android device from this link or play on your browser from that link. Have fun!

Google Play

You can publish this game on your web site by using below code.

<iframe src="https://retoxin.com/retoxin_games/colorfulcircles/" width="460" height="820" scrolling="none" frameborder="0"></iframe>


 

Colorful Circles 1
Colorful Circles 2
Colorful Circles 5
Colorful Circles 6

Helix-R

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Here is our newest game the Helix-R. You task is to guide the ball through a slowly descending tower. You can rotate the tower, in order to fit the ball through the gaps. Avoid hitting the red colored parts.

We also offer you the browser version of the game. Browser version of the game does not include any Ads. You can play the game without any distractions. Use this link to play the game in your browser. Use this link to play the game in your browser. 

If you would like to install the game to your Android device please simply click the below Google Play logo.

Have fun!

Google Play

You can publish this game on your web site by simply adding below code.

<iframe src="https://retoxin.com/retoxin_games/helixr/" width="400" height="700" scrolling="none" frameborder="0"></iframe>


Helix-R

Helix-R

Helix-R

Helix-R

Video Games Can Tackle Depression and Mental Disorders

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For a long time, psychiatrists have been warning over the link between depression and video games. But this situation is changing with the findings from the new studies. For instance, a compelling new study has followed thousands of Canadian teenagers for several years tracking associations between screen time use and depression. The research separated different types of screen time, and found while frequent television and social media activity correlated with increased symptoms of depression, video game and computer use seemed to have little or no negative effect. The researchers hypothesize the reason behind social media and television potentially being more damaging to mental health is that these forms of media more realistically depict idealized versions of teens and adults, unlike the abstracted depictions seen in video games. The study also suggests the average gamer is not socially isolated, with more than 70 per cent of gamers playing with other people either online or in person.

A study supporting the idea of using video games to alleviate symptoms of depression, was recently published. Kühn et al. (2018) showed that the fast paced action video games has potential to improve cognitive ability and reduce rumination in depressed individuals. They recruited 68 clinically depressed individuals that were randomized into the training group playing a fast paced action video game for 6 weeks or a waitlist control group. Before and after training participants completed online questionnaires and a neuropsychological test battery. The training group showed significantly higher subjective cognitive ability, as well as lower self-reported rumination at posttest in contrast to the control group. On a subsample with cognitive performance data they detected an improvement in executive function in the training compared with the control group. The results show that the fast paced action video game employed in the study improved Trail Making performance and may reduce rumination and enhance subjective cognitive ability.

In addition to those findings, video games have started to be developed to tackle mental health issues, particularly depression. Such as Sea of Solitude developed by Electronic Arts. Last year, a game called Celeste explored depression and anxiety through a protagonist who had to avoid physical and emotional obstacles. In 2017’s fantasy action-adventure video game Hellblade: Senua’s Sacrifice, a young Celtic warrior deals with psychosis. Other games in recent years, including Night in the Woods and Pry, have delved into self-identity, anger issues and post-traumatic stress disorder.

Some makers are now developing games to explicitly promote better mental health. Orpheus Self Care Entertainment, a start-up that was founded last year, is publishing virtual reality games in which players practice mindfulness and meditation through activities like dancing. In one game, players move their bodies in virtual reality to create patterns and shapes that move and change color. IThrive Games Foundation, a nonprofit that aims to improve mental health in teenagers through games and education, is also working on a new mobile game for teenagers who suffer from anxiety. The nonprofit is experimenting with a few different game styles — from role-playing to choose-your-own-adventure — for it. IThrive hopes to test the game by next year.

Rather than keeping people, especially teenagers, away from video games for the purpose of protecting their mental health, in the following years we will see video games being used in the fight against mental problems.


Kühn, S., Berna, F., Lüdtke, T., Gallinat, J., & Moritz, S. (2018). Fighting depression: action video game play may reduce rumination and increase subjective and objective cognition in depressed patients. Frontiers in psychology, 9, 129.

Retrogame Archaeology

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Atari Landfill Excavation

I am sure "Retrogame Archaeology" term sounds odd to you. It sounded strange to me in the first place too. But in science, a new field of research is emerging under this name. When you hear archeology, don't think of simply excavation of historical places. For instance, in 1983 Atari buried hundreds of thousands of games in Alamogordo, New Mexico and those games were discovered in 2014. This is not what they mean by "Retrogame Archeology".

In order to better understand "Retrogame Archeology", it is a good idea to look at a study in this field. Two scholars, John Aycock and Tara Copplestone (2018), was done an archaeological examination of an Atari 2600 game, the Entombed. In addition to shedding light on the term "Retrogame Archeology", there are two interesting findings in this study.

The Entombed Game

The Entombed, an Atari 2600 game released in 1982 by US Games. The player in this game is, appropriately, an archaeologist who must make their way through a zombie-infested maze. The maze in Entombed is particularly interesting: it is shaped in part by the extensive real-time constraints of the Atari 2600 platform, and also had to be generated efficiently and use next to no memory. The scholars reverse engineered key areas of the game’s code to uncover its unusual maze-generation algorithm, which they have also built a reconstruction of, and analyzed the mysterious table that drives it. In addition, they discovered what appears to be a 35-year-old bug in the code, as well as direct evidence of code-reuse practices amongst game developers.

They found that, variety of patterns shown in the maze generation relies on the pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) in the game code. PRNG was also include a bug and this bug is a very distinctive signature for it. They used this bug to identify programmers’ code reuse activity. Besides Entombed, they found this code in five other games. Three (M.A.D., Raft Rider, Towering Inferno) were also published by US Games; another, Q*bert, has people credited that intersect with the US Games games; the last one, Angriff der Luftflotten, appears to be a minor variant of M.A.D. It seems clear that the PRNG code either originated elsewhere and was copied into Entombed, or was copied from Entombed to other games.

You can watch the video below to get an idea about the game.

The second interesting point that scholars have found is related to the codes that make up the maze. Due to the constraints of the Atari 2600 platform mazes should be generated procedurally and should be reliably navigable in each time. Unfortunately reengineering of the game did not helped the scholars to understand the logic behind the maze generation procedure. The interview with one of the developers involved in the development of this game makes this situation more colorful.

Steve Sidley said:

‘The basic maze generating routine had been partially written by a stoner who had left. I contacted him to try and understand what the maze generating algorithm did. He told me it came upon him when he was drunk and whacked out of his brain, he coded it up in assembly overnight before he passed out, but now could not for the life of him remember how the algorithm worked.’

Sidley also observed that the maze code was uncommented, and when asked about the 32-byte table said
‘It was a mystery to me too, I couldn’t unscramble it. I just used it to generate the new row at the bottom of the screen.’ 

Maybe no-one ever really understood the logic of the algorithm. But there it is, in a 1982 Atari game, posing a seemingly unanswerable question. The fundamental logic that determines the next square is locked in a table of possible values written into the game’s code. Depending on the values of the five-square tile, the table tells the game to deposit either wall, no wall or a random choice between the two. It seems straightforward, but the thing is, no-one can work out how the table was made. Whatever the programmer did, it was a stroke of mild genius. Every time the game is played, a reliably navigable maze is pumped out. Were the table’s values random or even slightly different, the maze would likely fail to be drawn with a playable path through it. It just seems impossible to explain.

The act and experience of programming is, at its heart, a fundamentally human activity that results in the production of artifacts. The video games have become a major commercial enterprise and an important part of our culture. They store up their own record of human history. They are not just a technical product; they are a form of material culture which can be examined through archaeological lenses. It will not be wrong to say that in the distant future archaeologists will intensively do research on today's computer games to understand our lifestyle and culture.

Aycock, J., & Copplestone, T. (2018). Entombed: An archaeological examination of an Atari 2600 game. arXiv preprint arXiv:1811.02035.

A New Game “RoboShock”

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Here is the our newest game the RoboShock. Your task in this game is to keep the robot away from electrical sparks. You can control the robot with the joystick that appears in the bottom right corner when the game starts. If you are playing the browser version of the game use left-right arrow keys or a-d keys to control the robot. You can only move the robot to the right or left. The robot can not jump, but you can also steer while in the air.

We also offer you the browser version of the game. Browser version of the game does not include any Ads. You can play the game without any distractions. Use this link to play the game in your browser. 

If you would like to install the game to your Android device please simply click the below Google Play logo.

Have fun!

Google Play

 

You can publish this game on your web site by simply adding below code.

<iframe src="https://retoxin.com/retoxin_games/roboshock/" width="500" height="820" scrolling="none" frameborder="0"></iframe>


RoboShock Game

RoboShock Game

RoboShock Game

RoboShock Game

RoboShock Game

RoboShock Game

Play “Stack The Blocks” and “Save The Dragon” on Your Browser

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As we have promised before, we have released browser versions of our "Stack The Blocks" and "Save The Dragon" games. You can reach those games by simply clicking below logos.

 

Stack The Blocks
Save The Dragon

If you would like to publish those games on your web site you can use below codes to embed them.

<iframe src="https://retoxin.com/retoxin_games/stack_the_blocks/" width="500" height="800" scrolling="none" frameborder="0"></iframe>

<iframe src="https://retoxin.com/retoxin_games/save_the_dragon/" width="500" height="800" scrolling="none" frameborder="0"></iframe>

Lazy Eye Treatment For Adults By Video Games

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Amblyopia is often referred to as lazy eye, and it entails weaker vision in one eye due to a poor connection between the eye and the brain. It is a deficit in vision that arises from abnormal visual experience early in life. It was long thought to develop into a permanent deficit, unless properly treated before the end of the sensitive period for visual recovery. Until recently it was thought to be untreatable in adults, but new researches have proven that with consistent therapy even adults can improve their Amblyopia  at least partially recover visual acuity and stereopsis, especially through video games.

According to a study at the University of Berkeley, video games can help the treatment of lazy eyes in adults. The results of the study were published in August 2011 on the website of PLOS Biology. The researchers wanted to see if playing video games and exposure to the richer variety of details they provide could lead to visual improvements for patients with lazy eye similar to those seen with the more mundane visual tasks. They recruited 20 volunteers with amblyopia, ages 16 to 60 — half of them had strabismic amblyopia, which is marked by misaligned or crossed eyes; six had anisometropic amblyopia, in which the two eyes have significantly different prescriptions; another three had both conditions; and one volunteer had amblyopia caused by cataracts in one eye.

Boy Playing Game On Mobile

In the first experiment, 10 volunteers spent 20 two-hour sessions playing an action video game — "Medal of Honor: Pacific Assault," a first-person shooter game. In a second experiment, three other volunteers spent the same amount of time playing a non-action video game, "SimCity Societies," which required players to build things. As all the volunteers played the games, they wore a patch over their good eye.

Both action and non-action games yielded a 30 percent increase in visual acuity, or an average improvement of 1.5 lines on the standard letter chart used by optometrists. In comparison, it can take 120 hours of eye-patch therapy to see a one-line improvement on the letter chart in children with amblyopia. Performance was measured after every 10 hours of gaming, and some volunteers started improving earlier than 40 hours. Anisometropic volunteers also saw a 50 percent improvement in 3-D depth perception after 40 hours of playing video games. On the other hand some researchers found that even 45 minutes of therapy leads to improvement in visual acuity.

To check if these results were due to use of the eye patch instead of games, the scientists conducted a third experiment in which seven volunteers wore a patch over their good eye for 20 hours during normal daily activities such as watching television, reading books and surfing the Internet. In the end, they showed no improvement on vision tests. These volunteers were then asked to wear a patch while playing video games for 40 hours, and afterward they showed the same level of improvement as the volunteers in the other experiments.

To sum up, if you have lazy eye problem, you can simply patch the eye which has no lazy eye  problem, and play the video game to improve your vision acuity. There is no potential side effects and no risk. At the end of the day, you will have fun at least.